Suicide Prevention in Muslim Communities with Author/Activist Melody Moezzi – #SPSM Chat November 3rd, 2019.

SPSM 10-27-19 Announcement

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Marie Shanley (@Mxiety), and Joelle Marie (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “Suicide Prevention in Muslim Communities” with guest Melody Moezzi (@MelodyMoezzi).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What are the specific challenges of suicide prevention in Muslim communities?

What social issues might lead to a Muslim dying by suicide?

What are some lessons Western suicidologists can learn from Muslim communities?

Do you feel properly equipped/trained to support a Muslim in a suicidal crisis?

 

 

Further Reading and Watching:

MelodyMoezzi.com

Pre-Order The Rumi Prescription: How An Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life

Suicide Is On The Rise In The US, And Muslims Aren’t Immune – Buzzfeed News

The Khalil Center, a psychological and spiritual community wellness center advancing the professional practice of psychology rooted in Islamic principles.

Naseeha, Canadian nonprofit that serves US Muslims and operates a confidential, toll-free helpline

The Family & Youth Institute (FYI) – Suicide Prevention Community Action Guide

Center for Muslim Mental Health & Islamic Psychology

 

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Melody Moezzi is a writer, speaker, activist, attorney and award-winning author. Her books include the critically acclaimed memoir Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life and War on Error: Real Stories of American Muslims, which earned her a Georgia Author of the Year Award and a Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights Honorable Mention. Her next book, The Rumi Prescription: How an Ancient Mystic Poet Changed My Modern Manic Life, will be released on March 3, 2020—and is available for pre-order today.

In addition to writing and teaching full-time, Moezzi is also an experienced keynote speaker on a wide variety of issues—most notably mental health, wellness, inclusion, writing, and activism, especially surrounding Islamophobia, Iranian-American relations, and disability rights. Moezzi is a graduate of Wesleyan University (BA), the Emory University School of Law (JD), and the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health (MPH). She divides her time among Boston, San Diego and Wilmington, NC with her husband, Matthew, and their ungrateful cats, Keshmesh and Nazanin.

 

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How College Life Might Lead To Suicide with Dr. Jessi Gold – #SPSM Chat October 27th, 2019.

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This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Marie Shanley (@Mxiety), and Hudson Harris (@DanielleGlick) discuss “How College Life Might Lead To Suicide” with guest Dr. Jessi Gold (@DrJessiGold).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What are the factors that can lead a college student to a suicidal crisis?

How can mental health professionals best support college students in distress?

What are some effective classwork accommodations that are specific to people with mental health challenges?

Should a student experiencing suicidal thoughts take an academic leave?

 

 

Further Reading and Watching:

7 Little Ways to Deal With the Emotional Roller Coaster That Is College

How to Maintain Mental and Physical Health in College

What’s the Deal with Antidepressants and College Life?

Solid Gold Advice: How Do I Manage Stress During Finals?

 

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Jessica (“Jessi”) Gold, MD, MS, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine. She splits her clinical time between the Habif Health and Wellness Center and outpatient psychiatry at Barnes Jewish Hospital. She also teaches and mentors students and trainees, and is a regular writer for many media outlets. She has received numerous awards and accolades for her many contributions in the areas of mental health and psychiatry. She is a nationally recognized expert and speaks at national conferences, is interviewed regularly for news outlets, and consults for publishing and media.

Dr. Gold’s areas of interest are in college mental health, women’s mental health and gender equity, physician wellness, medical education, and the between popular media, stigma, and psychiatry. While she has published frequently in the more “traditional” methods of research papers and academic publications, she has also enjoyed teaching about mental health topics and decreasing stigma through writing for popular press outlets. She has been featured in, among others, Self, InStyle, Glamour, and the HuffPost.

In addition to her writing, Dr. Gold has presented on media as a tool for advocacy, leadership, and a way to combat misinformation nationally. She is very active on social media, particularly twitter (@drjessigold), and was named one of Medscape’s top 20 physician influencers on social media in 2019. She believes in using this medium to connect with and educate her patients on issues surrounding psychiatry and other mental health topics and to put a face to psychiatry that can help destigmatize and humanize the field.

 

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The Links Between The Opioid Crisis And Suicide with Janet Schnell And Carly Larson – #SPSM Chat October 20th, 2019.

SPSM 10-6-19 Announcement-9

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Joelle Marie (@LazTheLazTheLaz), and Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick) discuss “The Links Between The Opioid Crisis And Suicide” with guests Janet Schnell (@JanetSchnell) and Carly Larson (@TheJuniorisHere).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

How has the rise in opioid-related deaths changed how we see suicide?

Do you think opioid-related deaths are being reported accurately of overdose vs suicide?

How can opioid addiction lead to someone to being actively suicidal?

Is the War on Drugs a major contributor to the current opioid crisis?

 

 

Further Reading and Watching:

Harm Reduction Action Center

Suicide Deaths Are a Major Component of the Opioid Crisis that Must Be Addressed

Suicide, opioids tied to ongoing fall in US life expectancy: Third year of drop

Suicide and Substance Abuse – Addiction Center

Death-by-Opioid: How many Opioid Deaths are Suicides? Does It Matter?

Is The Suicide Prevention Field Well-Positioned To Address The Opioid Crisis?

 

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Janet Schnell, MSW, LSW, is the American Association of Suicidology Loss Division Chair and Dubois County Substance Abuse Council coordinator. She is an active member of the Dubois County Suicide Prevention Coalition, Quilt organizer for American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and facilitator for Survivors of Suicide of Dubois County.

 

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Carly Larson, based in Colorado, works in the mental health and substance fields. She is a harm reductionist and critical of abstinence-only programs.

 

 

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Human Connection: The Key To Suicide Prevention with Joseph Smarro – #SPSM Chat October 13th, 2019.

SPSM 10-6-19 Announcement (1)

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy), and Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick) discuss “Human Connection: The Key to Suicide Prevention” with guest Joseph Smarro (@SolutionPPlus1).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

How do you interpret “human connection” as it relates to suicide prevention?

How can suicide prevention be addressed in law enforcement?

What are your thoughts on police departments deploying Mental Health Crisis Units?

How do you practice empathy with the way you treat other people?

 

 

Learn more about Joseph Smarro and his work at solutionpointplus.com.

Further Reading and Watching:

I See You | Joseph A. Smarro | TEDxSanAntonio

SXSW review: San Antonio Police mental health officers highlighted in ‘Ernie and Joe’

The 4 Best Examples of Police and Mental Health Response

How This Police Department is Fighting For Its Officers’ Mental Health After Suicides

Law Enforcement Suicide Prevention and Awareness – The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

Smarro Headshot

Joseph Smarro is a highly sought mental health policy and training consultant. Not only is he a decorated US Marine Corps combat veteran, but he is also a celebrated mental health police officer. Joe has de-escalated hundreds of crisis situations in the field with zero uses of force. He is regarded as one of the best Crisis Intervention Team instructors in the nation. Joe has been instrumental in mental health advocacy and law enforcement policy at all levels of government to include the White House and the Department of Justice.

 

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The Role of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in Suicide Prevention with Dr. Ursula Whiteside – #SPSM Chat October 6th, 2019.

SPSM 10-6-19 Announcement

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Marie Shanley (@Mxiety), and Joelle Marie (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “The Role of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in Suicide Prevention” with guest Dr. Ursula Whiteside (@ursulawhiteside).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What have been your experiences with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), positive and/or negative?

Can DBT skills help people who are in a suicidal crisis?

How can we change the culture around suicide reduction?

How can we pair DBT skills with lived experience stories to help manage suicidal thoughts?

 

Learn more about Dr. Whiteside and her work at UrsulaWhiteside.org and NowMattersNow.org

Further Reading and Watching:

Reducing Suicidal Thoughts with DBT Skills

APA 2019 Main Stage: Ursula Whiteside on Suicide Prevention

What is Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)?

DBT Core Evidence

Evidence of Increased PTSD Symptoms in Autistics Exposed to Applied Behavior Analysis 

Modified Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Improve Emotion Regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Dr. Ursula Whiteside is a licensed clinical psychologist, CEO of NowMattersNow.org and Clinical Faculty at the University of Washington. As a researcher, she has been awarded grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Whiteside is co-investigator on a study involving over 18,000 high-risk suicidal patients in four major health systems. This study includes a guided version of NowMattersNow.org, a program she developed that includes skills for managing suicidal thoughts based on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and paired with Lived Experience stories.

Dr. Whiteside is national faculty for the Zero Suicide initiative, a practical approach to suicide prevention in health care and behavioral healthcare systems. This program was recently described by NPR on a segment titled “What Happens If You Try to Prevent Every Single Suicide?” Dr. Whiteside serves on the faculty of the National Action Alliance Zero Suicide Academy. She is also a founding board member of United Suicide Survivors International and a member of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Standards Trainings and Practices Committee.

As a person with Lived Experience, she strives to decrease the gap between “us and them” and to ensure that the voices of those who have been there are included in all relevant conversations: nothing about us without us.

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Suicide in Marginalized Communities with Kimya N. Dennis, PhD – #SPSM Chat September 29th, 2019.

SPSM 8-18-19 Announcement-4

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres) and Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick) discuss “Suicide in Marginalized Communities” with guest Kimya N. Dennis, PhD (@KimyaNDennisPhD).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

How should we approach suicide prevention differently in disadvantaged/marginalized populations?

What role does the criminal justice system play in suicide rates?

What are barriers that keep people of color under-represented in suicide prevention research and advocacy?

What are examples of effective versus performative actions towards diversity in organizations?

 

Links to Dr. Dennis’s Work:

www.kimyandennis.com

A Courageous Conversation Regarding Suicide in the African American Community (Facebook Live interview mentioned during the live-stream)

SUICIDE AND BLACK AMERICA

Shattering Mental Health Stereotypes: A Conversation with Dr. Kimya N. Dennis

Minority Suicides Rates, Childhood Emotional Neglect, Parents Rising

Connecting Our Communities with Medical-Health Professionals

Minority Mental Health: Important Every Month and Every Day

Suicide Isn’t Just A ‘White People Thing”

Criminal InJustice: Self-Harm and Suicide Among Blacks ~ Redefining and Re-categorizing Behaviors

How Communities Decide ‘Enough is Enough’

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

Questions for Kimya N. Dennis

Kimya N. Dennis, Ph.D. is a criminologist and sociologist as well as an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary educator, community advocate, researcher, and consultant. Dr. Dennis specializes in mental health, suicide and suicidal self-harm, law enforcement, criminal justice system, sexual health and freedom, and reproductive health and freedom.

Dr. Dennis collaborates with colleagues and practitioners in a range of fields and areas of expertise. Dennis considers interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaborations important for the development and sharing of knowledge and resources. Dennis is active in the community including hosting community events, presenting at community events, and on board of directors for organizations.

Dr. Dennis does interviews and guest columns for organizations such as Mental Health America of Virginia; outlets such as HuffPost BlogThinkProgress.orgLaura Carroll.com; newspapers Winston-Salem ChronicleWinston-Salem JournalRichmond Free Press; and 88.5 WFDD NPRAll Things Considered on 89.7 WOSU NPRMatt Townsend Show on BYU RadioStrange Fruit on 89.3 WFPL.

Dr. Dennis’s work has local, national, and international influence. One example is Dr. Dennis conducted the first known study solely of childfree people, predominantly women, of the immediate African diaspora with 62 respondents in 6 countries. This is large and substantial for a study solely of childfree people of the immediate African diaspora. Dr. Dennis also created and teaches the first known college course about the childfree. Addressing childfree of African diaspora captures factors contributing to racial and ethnic variance and gender variance in sexual health and freedom, reproductive health and freedom, mental-emotional health, and physical health.

 

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Dese’Rae L. Stage and Jess Stohlmann-Rainey Critique Suicide Prevention Month with #SPSM. September 22nd, 2019.

SPSM 8-18-19 Announcement-3

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy)), Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick), and Joelle Marie Nourse (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “Critiquing Suicide Prevention Month” with guests Dese’Rae L. Stage (@deseraestage) and Jess Stolhmann-Rainey (@JessStohlmann), hosts of the new podcast Suicide ‘n’ Stuff.

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What are your issues with Suicide Prevention Month?

Who benefits most from Suicide Prevention Month?

What are the potential negative results of censoring people’s stories?

How can we improve next year’s Suicide Prevention Month?

Dese’Rae L. Stage is one of the original members of SPSM Chat and has been one of the leading voices of the suicide attempt survivor movement. Jess Stohlmann-Rainey has created quite the stir with her critical views on suicidology and the mental healthcare system. Together, they are quite the force and have the power to change the way people with lived experience are treated for the better. I highly recommend checking out their new video podcast Suicide ‘n’ Stuff as well as everything else they’ve ever produced. Links (although by no means exhaustive) are below:

Suicide ‘n’ Stuff Podcast

DeseRaeStage.com

Live Through This – Dese’Rae L. Stage

https://livethroughthis.org/

Jess’s Story – https://livethroughthis.org/jess-stohlmann-rainey/

CBS News – Live Through This: Telling The Stories Of Suicide Survivors

https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/live-through-this-telling-the-stories-of-suicide-survivors/

SolutionsByJess.com 

How “Safe Messaging” Gaslights Suicidal People – Jess Stohlmann-Rainey

https://www.madinamerica.com/2019/08/safe-messaging-gaslights-suicidal-people/

Hegemonic Sanity and Suicide – Jess Stohlmann- Rainey

https://www.madinamerica.com/2018/08/hegemonic-sanity-and-suicide/

How Talking About Suicide Can Give People Something to Live For

https://www.oprahmag.com/life/health/a25416537/talking-about-suicide/

 

 

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and at spsmchat.com.*

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Dese’Rae L. Stage is an artist, mom, suicidologist, and advocate/activist. She is a self-taught photographer with experience in music journalism and crisis intervention training. She also has lived experience with suicidality and suicide loss—experiences she centers in her work. She ties these threads together with Live Through This, a multimedia storytelling series that aims to reduce prejudice and discrimination against suicide attempt survivors which reminds us that suicide is a human issue by elevating and amplifying survivors’ voices through raw, honest stories of survival, and pairing them with portraits—putting faces and names to the statistics that have been the only representation of attempt survivors in the past. She has interviewed and photographed 186 suicide attempt survivors in 36 US cities since 2010.

Live Through This has received media coverage from the New York TimesTIMECBS Evening NewsVICE, and many more. She is regularly invited to speak about her work and experiences at universities and suicide prevention events, including the NIMH Director’s Innovation Speaker Series alongside Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison. Live Through This is used as a resource by clinicians and as a teaching tool at the undergraduate and graduate levels. I’ve partnered with research teams in an effort to bring attempt survivor experiences to the forefront of suicide research. She is the main protagonist in a documentary about suicide prevention advocates called The S Word, currently screening nationwide. Her byline has appeared in Cosmopolitan (gay divorce), CNN (suicide), Romper (infertility), and more.

 

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Jess Stohlmann-Rainey is a researcher, trainer, and advocate serving as the Director of Program Development at Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners. She has focused her career on creating pathways to intersectional, justice-based, emotional support for marginalized communities.  Her specialties include designing and scaling sustainable programs, upstream approaches to prevention work, and empowering leaders to create positive change in the places we live, work, and learn. Jess has presented and trained nationally and internationally about suicide and violence prevention, diversity, gender, and leadership. Jess’s work has been published/featured in Mad in America, the RMIRECC’s Short Takes on Suicide PreventionNo Restraints with Rudy CaserasPostvention in Action: The International Handbook of Suicide Bereavement, and The Suicide Prevention Resource Center. Jess centers her lived expertise as an ex-patient and suicide attempt and loss survivor in her work. She lives in Denver, CO with her partner (Jon) and a 16 year old chiweenie (Marty), and has a taxidermied two-headed duckling (Phil & Lil) for an office mate.

 

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