Human Connection: The Key To Suicide Prevention with Joseph Smarro – #SPSM Chat October 13th, 2019.

SPSM 10-6-19 Announcement (1)

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy), and Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick) discuss “Human Connection: The Key to Suicide Prevention” with guest Joseph Smarro (@SolutionPPlus1).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

How do you interpret “human connection” as it relates to suicide prevention?

How can suicide prevention be addressed in law enforcement?

What are your thoughts on police departments deploying Mental Health Crisis Units?

How do you practice empathy with the way you treat other people?

 

 

Learn more about Joseph Smarro and his work at solutionpointplus.com.

Further Reading and Watching:

I See You | Joseph A. Smarro | TEDxSanAntonio

SXSW review: San Antonio Police mental health officers highlighted in ‘Ernie and Joe’

The 4 Best Examples of Police and Mental Health Response

How This Police Department is Fighting For Its Officers’ Mental Health After Suicides

Law Enforcement Suicide Prevention and Awareness – The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP)

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Joseph Smarro is a highly sought mental health policy and training consultant. Not only is he a decorated US Marine Corps combat veteran, but he is also a celebrated mental health police officer. Joe has de-escalated hundreds of crisis situations in the field with zero uses of force. He is regarded as one of the best Crisis Intervention Team instructors in the nation. Joe has been instrumental in mental health advocacy and law enforcement policy at all levels of government to include the White House and the Department of Justice.

 

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The Role of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in Suicide Prevention with Dr. Ursula Whiteside – #SPSM Chat October 6th, 2019.

SPSM 10-6-19 Announcement

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Marie Shanley (@Mxiety), and Joelle Marie (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “The Role of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in Suicide Prevention” with guest Dr. Ursula Whiteside (@ursulawhiteside).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What have been your experiences with Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), positive and/or negative?

Can DBT skills help people who are in a suicidal crisis?

How can we change the culture around suicide reduction?

How can we pair DBT skills with lived experience stories to help manage suicidal thoughts?

 

Learn more about Dr. Whiteside and her work at UrsulaWhiteside.org and NowMattersNow.org

Further Reading and Watching:

Reducing Suicidal Thoughts with DBT Skills

APA 2019 Main Stage: Ursula Whiteside on Suicide Prevention

What is Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)?

DBT Core Evidence

Evidence of Increased PTSD Symptoms in Autistics Exposed to Applied Behavior Analysis 

Modified Dialectical Behavior Therapy to Improve Emotion Regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat as well as on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and Mixer channel. All past episodes are archived and available to watch on-demand at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Dr. Ursula Whiteside is a licensed clinical psychologist, CEO of NowMattersNow.org and Clinical Faculty at the University of Washington. As a researcher, she has been awarded grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Whiteside is co-investigator on a study involving over 18,000 high-risk suicidal patients in four major health systems. This study includes a guided version of NowMattersNow.org, a program she developed that includes skills for managing suicidal thoughts based on Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and paired with Lived Experience stories.

Dr. Whiteside is national faculty for the Zero Suicide initiative, a practical approach to suicide prevention in health care and behavioral healthcare systems. This program was recently described by NPR on a segment titled “What Happens If You Try to Prevent Every Single Suicide?” Dr. Whiteside serves on the faculty of the National Action Alliance Zero Suicide Academy. She is also a founding board member of United Suicide Survivors International and a member of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Standards Trainings and Practices Committee.

As a person with Lived Experience, she strives to decrease the gap between “us and them” and to ensure that the voices of those who have been there are included in all relevant conversations: nothing about us without us.

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Suicide in Marginalized Communities with Kimya N. Dennis, PhD – #SPSM Chat September 29th, 2019.

SPSM 8-18-19 Announcement-4

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres) and Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick) discuss “Suicide in Marginalized Communities” with guest Kimya N. Dennis, PhD (@KimyaNDennisPhD).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

How should we approach suicide prevention differently in disadvantaged/marginalized populations?

What role does the criminal justice system play in suicide rates?

What are barriers that keep people of color under-represented in suicide prevention research and advocacy?

What are examples of effective versus performative actions towards diversity in organizations?

 

Links to Dr. Dennis’s Work:

www.kimyandennis.com

A Courageous Conversation Regarding Suicide in the African American Community (Facebook Live interview mentioned during the live-stream)

SUICIDE AND BLACK AMERICA

Shattering Mental Health Stereotypes: A Conversation with Dr. Kimya N. Dennis

Minority Suicides Rates, Childhood Emotional Neglect, Parents Rising

Connecting Our Communities with Medical-Health Professionals

Minority Mental Health: Important Every Month and Every Day

Suicide Isn’t Just A ‘White People Thing”

Criminal InJustice: Self-Harm and Suicide Among Blacks ~ Redefining and Re-categorizing Behaviors

How Communities Decide ‘Enough is Enough’

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and at spsmchat.com.

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

Questions for Kimya N. Dennis

Kimya N. Dennis, Ph.D. is a criminologist and sociologist as well as an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary educator, community advocate, researcher, and consultant. Dr. Dennis specializes in mental health, suicide and suicidal self-harm, law enforcement, criminal justice system, sexual health and freedom, and reproductive health and freedom.

Dr. Dennis collaborates with colleagues and practitioners in a range of fields and areas of expertise. Dennis considers interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary collaborations important for the development and sharing of knowledge and resources. Dennis is active in the community including hosting community events, presenting at community events, and on board of directors for organizations.

Dr. Dennis does interviews and guest columns for organizations such as Mental Health America of Virginia; outlets such as HuffPost BlogThinkProgress.orgLaura Carroll.com; newspapers Winston-Salem ChronicleWinston-Salem JournalRichmond Free Press; and 88.5 WFDD NPRAll Things Considered on 89.7 WOSU NPRMatt Townsend Show on BYU RadioStrange Fruit on 89.3 WFPL.

Dr. Dennis’s work has local, national, and international influence. One example is Dr. Dennis conducted the first known study solely of childfree people, predominantly women, of the immediate African diaspora with 62 respondents in 6 countries. This is large and substantial for a study solely of childfree people of the immediate African diaspora. Dr. Dennis also created and teaches the first known college course about the childfree. Addressing childfree of African diaspora captures factors contributing to racial and ethnic variance and gender variance in sexual health and freedom, reproductive health and freedom, mental-emotional health, and physical health.

 

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Dese’Rae L. Stage and Jess Stohlmann-Rainey Critique Suicide Prevention Month with #SPSM. September 22nd, 2019.

SPSM 8-18-19 Announcement-3

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy)), Danielle Glick (@DanielleGlick), and Joelle Marie Nourse (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “Critiquing Suicide Prevention Month” with guests Dese’Rae L. Stage (@deseraestage) and Jess Stolhmann-Rainey (@JessStohlmann), hosts of the new podcast Suicide ‘n’ Stuff.

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

What are your issues with Suicide Prevention Month?

Who benefits most from Suicide Prevention Month?

What are the potential negative results of censoring people’s stories?

How can we improve next year’s Suicide Prevention Month?

Dese’Rae L. Stage is one of the original members of SPSM Chat and has been one of the leading voices of the suicide attempt survivor movement. Jess Stohlmann-Rainey has created quite the stir with her critical views on suicidology and the mental healthcare system. Together, they are quite the force and have the power to change the way people with lived experience are treated for the better. I highly recommend checking out their new video podcast Suicide ‘n’ Stuff as well as everything else they’ve ever produced. Links (although by no means exhaustive) are below:

Suicide ‘n’ Stuff Podcast

DeseRaeStage.com

Live Through This – Dese’Rae L. Stage

https://livethroughthis.org/

Jess’s Story – https://livethroughthis.org/jess-stohlmann-rainey/

CBS News – Live Through This: Telling The Stories Of Suicide Survivors

https://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/live-through-this-telling-the-stories-of-suicide-survivors/

SolutionsByJess.com 

How “Safe Messaging” Gaslights Suicidal People – Jess Stohlmann-Rainey

https://www.madinamerica.com/2019/08/safe-messaging-gaslights-suicidal-people/

Hegemonic Sanity and Suicide – Jess Stohlmann- Rainey

https://www.madinamerica.com/2018/08/hegemonic-sanity-and-suicide/

How Talking About Suicide Can Give People Something to Live For

https://www.oprahmag.com/life/health/a25416537/talking-about-suicide/

 

 

*Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and at spsmchat.com.*

**SPSM Chat includes content about suicide and other experiences that may be traumatizing to you. You may experience strong or overwhelming emotions as a result. If you find yourself in distress or crisis, we encourage you to seek out support that works for you. Many people find it helpful to talk to a friend, family member, or someone else they trust.

If you would like formal crisis support, you can call National Suicide Prevention Lifeline ‘1-800-273-TALK (8255)’, Trans Lifeline at 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada), or The Trevor Project at 866-488-7386. If you don’t like talking on the phone, you can text HOME to 741741 to get to Crisis Text Line, or you can try Lifeline Crisis Chat. If you’d like to talk to a peer, warmline.org contains links to warmlines in the United States. If you’re not in the U.S., you can go to https://www.iasp.info/resources/Crisis_Centres/ for a connection to crisis centers around the world.

Many of these resources could utilize restrictive interventions, like active rescues (wellness or welfare checks) involving law enforcement or emergency services. A warmline is least likely to do this, but still might have these policies. You can ask if this is a possibility at any point in your conversation if this is a concern for you.

The following do not implement any restrictive interventions for people considering suicide:

Peerly Human online support groups: https://peerlyhuman.blogspot.com/
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860 (U.S.) or 877-330-6366 (Canada)**

 

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Dese’Rae L. Stage is an artist, mom, suicidologist, and advocate/activist. She is a self-taught photographer with experience in music journalism and crisis intervention training. She also has lived experience with suicidality and suicide loss—experiences she centers in her work. She ties these threads together with Live Through This, a multimedia storytelling series that aims to reduce prejudice and discrimination against suicide attempt survivors which reminds us that suicide is a human issue by elevating and amplifying survivors’ voices through raw, honest stories of survival, and pairing them with portraits—putting faces and names to the statistics that have been the only representation of attempt survivors in the past. She has interviewed and photographed 186 suicide attempt survivors in 36 US cities since 2010.

Live Through This has received media coverage from the New York TimesTIMECBS Evening NewsVICE, and many more. She is regularly invited to speak about her work and experiences at universities and suicide prevention events, including the NIMH Director’s Innovation Speaker Series alongside Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison. Live Through This is used as a resource by clinicians and as a teaching tool at the undergraduate and graduate levels. I’ve partnered with research teams in an effort to bring attempt survivor experiences to the forefront of suicide research. She is the main protagonist in a documentary about suicide prevention advocates called The S Word, currently screening nationwide. Her byline has appeared in Cosmopolitan (gay divorce), CNN (suicide), Romper (infertility), and more.

 

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Jess Stohlmann-Rainey is a researcher, trainer, and advocate serving as the Director of Program Development at Rocky Mountain Crisis Partners. She has focused her career on creating pathways to intersectional, justice-based, emotional support for marginalized communities.  Her specialties include designing and scaling sustainable programs, upstream approaches to prevention work, and empowering leaders to create positive change in the places we live, work, and learn. Jess has presented and trained nationally and internationally about suicide and violence prevention, diversity, gender, and leadership. Jess’s work has been published/featured in Mad in America, the RMIRECC’s Short Takes on Suicide PreventionNo Restraints with Rudy CaserasPostvention in Action: The International Handbook of Suicide Bereavement, and The Suicide Prevention Resource Center. Jess centers her lived expertise as an ex-patient and suicide attempt and loss survivor in her work. She lives in Denver, CO with her partner (Jon) and a 16 year old chiweenie (Marty), and has a taxidermied two-headed duckling (Phil & Lil) for an office mate.

 

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The Mighty’s Sarah Schuster (@saraheliztweets) Chats Sharing Your Lived Experience Story with #SPSM. September 15th, 2019. 9pm ET.

SPSM 8-18-19 Announcement-2

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy)), and Joelle Marie Nourse (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “Sharing Your Lived Experience Story” with Guest Sarah Schuster (@SarahElizTweets).

Watch as we discuss issues such as:

Why is sharing your lived experience story important?

What are some tips for sharing your story effectively?

What are some things to stay away from when sharing your story?

What can people with lived experience do beyond just sharing their story?

Sarah Schuster is the Editorial Director of The Mighty’s Contributor Network. Previously, she was The Mighty’s mental health section editor. Part of her job is to edit and publish people’s lived experience stories as well as help elevate them using The Mighty’s enormous online audience. She is also someone who is always open to evolving her views and improving how she approaches editing and published based on contributor feedback. Sarah was actually a guest on SPSM Chat a few years ago so it’s worth going out of your way and comparing the two.

You can read all of Sarah Schuster’s work for The Mighty at themighty.com/u/sarah-schuster.

 

***Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channelFacebook page, and at spsmchat.com.***

Content Warning: SPSM Chat contains extensive discussion of suicide (attempt survivor, loss survivor, chronic suicidal thoughts). However, suicide prevention best practices and safe messaging are considered and encouraged.

 

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Sarah Schuster is the Editorial Director of The Mighty’s Contributor Network. Previously, she was The Mighty’s mental health section editor. You can connect with her on Twitter @saraheliztweets.

 

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Dr. Anthony Bean (@VideoGameDoc) Chats Video Games and Our Mental Health with #SPSM. September 8th, 2019. 9pm ET.

SPSM 8-25-19 Announcement-4

This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Marie Shanley (@Mxiety), Danielle Glick (@danielleglick),  and Hudson Harris (@MentalStrategy) discuss “The Right to Suicide” with Guest Dr. Anthony Bean (@VideoGameDoc). Anthony Bean, Ph.D. is a Licensed Clinical Depth Psychologist, video game researcher, and the Executive Director at The Telos Project, a thriving nonprofit mental health clinic in Fort Worth, Texas which focuses on video gamers and their families. Dr. Bean utilizes video game character identification techniques and other archetypal experiences to understand and develop intrinsic motivations for playing, personal identity, and discovering conscious and unconscious conflicts, cognitions, and behaviors. Watch as we discuss issues such as “Can video games help our mental health?” “How can video games prevent suicide?” “Can video games cause people to be more violent?” “How do video game characters help us cope?”

You can learn more about Dr. Bean and his work at AnthonyBean.com.

***Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channel, Facebook page, and at spsmchat.com.***

Content Warning: SPSM Chat contains extensive discussion of suicide (attempt survivor, loss survivor, chronic suicidal thoughts). However, suicide prevention best practices and safe messaging are considered and encouraged.

 

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Dr. Anthony Bean is a Licensed Clinical Depth Psychologist, video game researcher, and the Executive Director at The Telos Project, a thriving nonprofit mental health clinic in Fort Worth, Texas which focuses on video gamers and their families.  He has been consulted as an expert for CNN, Inverse, Polygon, and internationally for Gehirn & Geist, while also appearing on Radio, Podcasts, and being a sought after Keynote Speaker and conference speaker in the United States, Canada, and Russia.  He holds a Doctorate in Philosophy in Clinical Depth Psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute and specialize in the therapeutic implications of video games and gaming, working with children and adolescents, and the use of video game character identification as a therapeutic technique. He has also authored multiple academic articles, book chapters, and the two books Working with Video Gamers and Games in Therapy: A Clinician’s Guide (Routledge, 2018) and The Psychology of Zelda: Linking Our World to the Legend of Zelda Series (Ben Bella, 2019) while being active on twitter.(@VideoGameDoc).

Additionally, Dr. Bean specializes in video games, children & adolescents, and the virtual worlds played in.  He is considered an expert in this growing field, has been published extensively in the discipline.  He works with children, adolescents, and adults who  play video games and their families to better understand the immersive effects video games have upon the individual and resulting family dynamics. Dr. Bean utilizes video game character identification techniques and other archetypal experiences to understand and develop intrinsic motivations for playing, personal identity, and discovering conscious and unconscious conflicts, cognitions, and behaviors.  He has worked with children, adolescents, and adults on discovering their own symbolic transformations through the playing of video games and dealing with depression, trauma, anxiety, social isolation, and other common diagnoses to great success.

Dr. Bean currently teaches at local colleges in person and online on the concepts of psychology, video games, life experiences, and how they are overlaid upon our lives.  He is a regular guest of other radio shows and podcasts.  If you would like to have him on your show, podcast, conference panel or for any other questions; he can be reached at anthonymbeanphd@gmail.com.

 

DR. ANTHONY BEAN IN THE NEWS:

CNN: WHO classifies ‘gaming disorder’ as mental health condition

Inverse: Psychologists Criticize WHO Decision to Recognize ‘Gaming Disorder’

Inven (Korea, Use Google Translate): List of official WHO game disabilities, listened to experts from domestic and overseas

Polygon: ‘Gaming disorder’ classified as a mental health condition, but is the move premature? Many scientists continue to be skeptical

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Mark Henick (@MarkHenick) Chats The Right to Suicide with #SPSM. September 1st, 2019. 9pm ET.

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This week on #SPSM Chat co-hosts Rudy Caseres (@RudyCaseres), Danielle Glick (@danielleglick), Marie Shanley (@Mxiety) and Joelle Marie Nourse (@LazTheLazTheLaz) discuss “The Right to Suicide” with Guest Mark Henick (@MarkHenick). Mark Henick is a Canadian-based mental health strategist who is highly sought after by the media to give his views on suicide prevention and the Canadian mental healthcare system. Mark’s TEDx Talk “Why We Choose Suicide” has been viewed on YouTube over six million times. Watch as we wrestle with difficult questions such as “Do people have a right to take their own life?” “Should physician-assisted suicide include people who suffer from lifelong mental distress?” “Would more people die by suicide if it were easier to do so?” and “Can someone be a suicide prevention advocate and also support the right to suicide?”

You can learn more about Mark and his work at MarkHenick.com.

Watch as we wrestle with difficult questions such as “Do people have a right to take their own life?” “Should physician-assisted suicide include people who suffer from lifelong mental distress?” “Would more people die by suicide if it were easier to do so?” and “Can someone be a suicide prevention advocate and also support the right to suicide?”

Link to study mentioned during the livestream here:

Netherlands sees sharp increase in people choosing euthanasia due to ‘mental health problems’

 

***Watch SPSM Chat live every Sunday 6pm PT/9pm ET at Twitter.com/spsmchat. All past episodes can be viewed on-demand on the SPSM YouTube channel, Facebook page, and at spsmchat.com.***

Content Warning: SPSM Chat contains extensive discussion of suicide (attempt survivor, loss survivor, chronic suicidal thoughts). However, suicide prevention best practices and safe messaging are considered and encouraged.

 

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Mark Henick dedicated his life from an early age to opening minds and creating change. Now he regularly speaks to diverse audiences about mental health, mental illness, suicide, advocacy, recovery, and hope. Mark’s TEDx talk on suicide is among the most watched in the world. His keynotes, panels, workshops, and media appearances aim to break the stigma that prevents people from speaking openly about their mental health. Mark believes that freedom is found in overcoming the barriers that stigma, disempowerment, and disconnection build. Mark has seen countless times, personally and professionally, that each and every person has the potential to unlock their most true and hopeful self regardless of how dark it may seem.

 

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