#SPSM chats about digital crisis communication best practices: Emojis, memes, GIFs and other enriched text, 1/29/17, 9pCT

SPSM experts chat about how the rise in digital communications using emojis, GIFs, and memes have impacted, or will impact best practice standards for digital crisis communications. Join us Sunday, 1/29/17, 9pCT

2016 saw a dramatic rise in use of emojis, memes, GIFs and other rich digital communication in our every day interactions. Social media platforms heavily used by the general public (such as Facebook) added features to expand the search-ability and easy use of “stickers,” emojis, GIFs and other images to quickly and visually communicate complex thoughts and feelings with others.

These digital features are increasingly included in apps most people use to do basic things, such as text messaging (which is a common way of communicating, and which is one means for seeking out crisis services). Additionally, early analysis of text language suggest that frequency of emoji use might be one digital signal related to mood and mental health.

While, in many cases, the present standard in crisis text services is to disable features for rich digital communication on the platform that support that crisis service, is this the best idea, going forward?

If crisis services become embedded in most major social media platforms (a trend that may be coming), and if the trend of digitally rich communication continues, it makes sense to consider early on what should be the best practices are for crisis communications (and suicide prevention messaging).

Watch us stream LIVE here (and contribute your own ideas/thoughts/content on Twitter, using the #SPSM hashtag):

 

 

About spsmchat

weekly twitter chat and sometimes blog and video blog dedicated to the latest information about suicide prevention and social media (SPSM)
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